Category Archives: designers

Gafni -The guy who puts the cycling into recycling

Isn’t this nifty?

Appearantly it will hit the marked next year and retail for $60-90.

The Sartorialist

I love following The Sartorialist and just happened across this little film about Scott Schuman and his way of working. Very interesting.

Alexander Wang’s or Hummel’s Chevrons?

I was reading though Topshop’s blog, Inside Out, the other day and couldn’t believe my eyes, when I saw these images:

(Images taken from Inside Out post)

They are from a fashion show by Alexander Wang, who is known for cleverly mixing sporty and urban styles.

What made me do a double-take though, is the chevron prints and colours and their resemblance to Hummel designs. Hummel is huge here in Denmark. In fact, just the other day, I picked my son up from a birthday party and while there, three parents were frantically trying to figure out which of the six identical blue Hummel trainers belonged to their kid (needless to say, for once I was quite smug, that my son’s were the cheapo black and white trainers that none of the other kids owned). Actually, I usually never buy “branded” clothes, yet when I think about it we have quite a pile of Hummel clothes between us… There are all the T-shirts, that my husband wears for work, Hummel branded with the name of the physio clinic he works at on the back, The football kit and ball, that my son received while on a sponsored summer camp and the track suit that my daughter ended up choosing because I made the mistake of taking one of her friends along, when shopping for her gymnastics outfit;-)

Anyway, sorry, I’ve gone completely off topic here, trying to portray how common the image of those chevrons are around here. What I wanted to say was, if you’re not already familiar with Hummel, have a look at this:

(My daughter’s tracksuit top)

or this:

(one of my hubby’s work T’s -image taken from the Hummel website)

I realise they are only chevron shapes and that these and zig-zags are popular patterns in textiles at the moment, but chevrons of this size and direction down the sleeves, have been Hummel’s trademark almost from the beginning of their existence in the 1920’s.

(Danish football team in 1979 -image taken from Hummel’s website)

There always is an immense amount of copying (that is not to say that anyone has been copying here… I’m staying well clear…) going on in the fashion industry, as it is hard to determine ownership of designs that are not completely identical. It varies between countries how close (by percentage) designs may be, but how do you determine this… Also, trends make it inevitable, that very similar designs will emerge from different sides. However, in this case, it is notable that the design on one part has been around for so long and is such a big part of their brand identity.

I find this particular case very interesting though, as I cannot help wonder if it won’t turn out to Hummel’s advantage, even if no legal action is taken, to have a high end designer produce designs so close to their particular trademark, long since established?

I contacted Hummel, asking how they stand on this and was told, that they are in the proccess of making a decision on how and if to react to this. They promised to let me know, as soon as a decision is reached, so watch this space. I know I will.

Inspiration: Tailored Mens Wear Trend in Women’s Fashion

Another image from my “Inspiration” folder. (Again without a source, sorry!):

I just love this image and to me, it illustrates a trend, that has lasted a long time now; the influence of classic tailored mens wear on women’s fashions. I had to make a shopping guide (a leaflet, that designers take with them on inspiration trips with all the trend research they’ve collected, predicting the trends for the coming season) in 2009, and that was a strong emerging trend then. I just googled and found these as well:

Mens wear inspired pieces are all over the high street, certainly here in Denmark, anyway. This waistcoat demonstrates well how a classic mens wear item, becomes feminine with very little effort. The addition of the bow and the pleats on the pockets and of course the items you pair it with make all the difference. Then of course there are the shoes, a pair of flat brougues can dress down a pencil skirt or you can even get heeled ones:Next up, I reckon, are different takes on classic fringed boots (these are from Topshop):

 

It’s a style, that I continue to find very inspiring. I like the contrasts between the masculine and the feminine, and I find, that when you put something classically tailored for a man into a faminine context like this, it enhances the famininity.

Also, it is a trend easily adapted. -It can be dressy, casual, proffesional, or sexy.

Stitched Vogue Covers

I’ve sprained my ankle and have been forced to spend more hours on the sofa with my foot at ridiculous heights, than I would like. The upside to this, is the time I’ve had to read and browse through the internet on my phone. This is how I came across the fab embroidered pieces by photography student Inge Jacobsen.

Vogue magazine cross-stitched designs - Inge Jacobsen

The final year Kingston student have hand embroidered over three Vogue covers and other images for her final degree show in June, exploring such things as feminine culture and the link between leisure activities of her generation and those of previous generations. Also she says it is a way for her to “intervene into an exclusive world, I wasn’t a part of” in an interview with Vogue.com where her work has already been featured. Now that must be quite a confidence boost, just in time for your final exam / show!

Inge Jacobsen’s exploration into popular culture and the culture of mass produced imagery, picks up on several trends and themes and already have won great recognition online, and with the massive current trend for anything stitched, I would say watch this space and Inge, get ready to be copied on Etsy! Mind you, with each cover taking 40-50 hours to painstakingly punch holes and stitch, it may not be worth their while… It would add another dimension to the art though, wouldn’t it; Mass produced images turned into one-of-a-kind art, turned into mass-produced art… Time will tell. I certainly would frame these originals, though:-)

Knit what you’d expect!

I’ve had a soft spot for these poufs by Christien Meindertsma for a couple of years now.

I love the chunkyness of the wool (or cotton rope) and the way it shows off the knitted structure and pattern. I’ve knitted with wire, strips of plastic bags and other weird things for a project before and if I could get hold of some cotton rope, I’d love to have a go at structural things like this. (Also some of the colours of these would be perfect for our living room …just saying!)

And speaking of quirky knitted interior items, have a look at this spectacular lamp, which I really quite like. It’s called Poppy and is by Melanie Porter. Wouldn’t this really cheer you up on a cloudy day?

I’m not sure my husband would share my sentiments though…

Or what about these chairs also by Melanie Porter:

I think they would all look good in an eclectic interior or in a very streamlined white one, where they would stand out against the “blank canvas”

Origami Fashion

I’m working on some oregami- and Sydney Operahouse- inspired designs at the moment and just thought I’d share this photograph.

(Source unknown -it’s been on my computer for ages…)

And some more origami dresses…

Calvin Klein Origami dressCalvin Klein, Spring 2009

Christian Dior Haute Couture Spring 2007

I love how in all three examples the fabric is simple white. It is crisp like paper which bears connotations to the original origami material. Yet the origami folding gives it the most incredible textures.